13 Flowering Plants Rabbits Will Leave Alone

13 Flowering Plants Rabbits Will Leave Alone

There are some furry critters that will nibble just a few flowers or fresh shoots from your garden, and that’s okay. But rabbits, well, they can go too far.

When they start consuming such large portions of your precious flowering plants that you stop using the word “cute” to describe the babies, or you don’t find Bugs Bunny to be quite so funny anymore, well, it’s time to take action.

While there are lots of planting, maintenance, and fencing strategies that might keep rabbits out of your garden, one of the easiest tactics is simply to grow flowering plants that the rabbits will leave alone.

If these big-eared pests have become a big problem for you, there are lots of attractive flowering options they won’t gobble.

Just remember, no plant is guaranteed to be 100 percent rabbit-proof. There’s always that youngster who will eat anything – once.

Or, if forage is in super short supply in your area, or a drought or extra-rainy season is killing off their preferred food sources, they may chomp on anything to survive.

Under normal conditions in a temperate and thriving landscape, these choices will help you say goodbye to rabbit diners. Here’s the A-list I’ll be sharing:

Ready to grow some beautiful flowers that rabbits won’t touch? Consider these:

1. Allium ( spp.)

Ornamental perennial allium bulbs bloom in soul-satisfying shades of blue, purple, or bright white, and options range from six-inch minis () to six-foot mammoths ().

Purple flowering alliums growing in a botanical garden with trees and a building in soft focus in the background.A close up of purple and white flowering alliums with a wooden fence in the background.Allium Bulbs – All In One Mix

They’ll do well in the sun and can tolerate partial shade, growing well in Zones 4-9.

Learn more about how to grow flowering alliums in this guide.

An all-in-one mix of purple and white allium bulbs is available from Eden Brothers in bags of six, 12, or 18.

2. Anise Hyssop ()

Not only are the bright blue blooms of this mint relative bird and butterfly magnets, you can use anise hyssop leaves in your cooking in place of mint.

A close up of a butterfly feeding from a blue anise hyssop flower, on a soft focus background.Purple anise hyssop growing in the summer garden with foliage in soft focus in the background.Anise Hyssop

Anise hyssop is hardy in Zones 4-9, and will grow in full sun to part shade.

Read more about growing anise hyssop in your garden.

You can purchase anise hyssop plants in three-inch containers from Nature Hills Nursery.

3. Bee Balm ( spp.)

Bees and other pollinators adore it, rabbits, not so much.

A close up of a hummingbird feeding on a bright red bee balm flower in light sunshine pictured on a green soft focus background.A close up of a clump of pink bee balm growing in the garden.Bee Balm

You can learn more about its medicinal value by reading our bee balm growing guide.

You can find bee balm seeds at Eden Brothers in packets of various sizes.

4. Begonia ()

These old-fashioned beauties add a punch of color anywhere it’s needed in the flower bed.

Wax begonias may have green or bronzed leaves and pink, white, or red single or double blooms.

Red flowering begonias planted in a garden border, flanked by lawn in the summer garden.available from Home Depot.

5. Black-Eyed Susan ()

This cottage garden favorite is one flowering perennial that marauding rabbits will pass over.

Plus, it provides those appealing daisy-type golden or deep red flowers in average soil. It will need full sun, though, and it won’t grow well in containers, so plan to plant it in raised beds or in the ground.

A close up of a yellow black-eyed susan growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.Black-Eyed Susan

Otherwise, black-eyed Susans are low maintenance and will tolerate drought. They’re hardy in Zones 3-9.

Learn more about growing black-eyed Susans in this guide.

You can find black-eyed Susan seeds in packets of various sizes available at True Leaf Market.

6. Catmint ()

Catnip’s more subdued cousin catmint grows in average soil and produces subtly scented gray-green leaves followed by blue, pink, or white blooms.

A close up of catmint growing in the summer garden with bright blue flowers and green foliage.A close up of a clump of blue flowering catmint in a garden border with lawn in the background.Catmint

This perennial gets about a foot tall and is hardy in Zones 3-9.

Learn how to grow faassen’s catmint in this guide.

Catmint seeds are available from Eden Brothers in various packet sizes.

You can also buy pots of ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint from Nature Hills Nursery.

7. Chives ()

Chives are members of the onion family, that includes garlic, leeks, and spring onions are a secret weapon against bunnies who are treating your garden like their personal salad bowl.

A close up of a clump of chives growing in the garden, with bright purple flowers pictured on a soft focus background.A close up of chive herbs growing in the garden, with pale purple flowers and foliage in soft focus in the background.Common Chives

Check out our guide to learn more about growing chives.

You can find common chive seeds () in various packet sizes available at Eden Brothers and bare root ‘Cha Cha’ chives from Burpee.

8. Foxglove ()

You’ll be depriving certain hopping pests of dinner, but you won’t be missing out on drama or beauty when you grow these showy 18-inch-and-up spikes of pink, rose, white, and yellow flowers.

A garden border with flowering foxgloves growing in front of a tall hedge, fading to soft focus in the background.the shade garden. Old timers will tell you that the hotter your growing area, the more shade foxgloves require.

A close up of the bright pink flowers of the foxglove variety 'Arctic Fox' pictured on a soft focus background.Foxglove ‘Arctic Fox’

Most importantly, don’t plant foxglove anywhere young children will encounter them. They are poisonous!

Foxgloves are hardy in Zones 4-10.

You can find ‘Arctic Fox’ plants available at Burpee, or for mixed color seeds specially bred to bloom the first year, try ‘Foxy,’ also from Burpee.

9. Hardy Geranium ( spp.)

Here’s another flowering plant that deters nibblers with its scent.

Purple cranesbill geraniums growing in the summer garden with purple and pink flowers in soft focus in the background.A close up of a clump of hardy geraniums 'Rozanne' growing in the summer garden, with bright purple flowers and light green foliage.‘Rozanne’ Hardy Geranium

One of the many reasons I love hardy geraniums is that you can readily grow more by rooting cuttings in water.

Learn more about cultivating and propagating cranesbill geraniums in our growing guide.

You’ll be rewarded with a long-lasting perennial that blooms from late spring to early fall.

Hardy geranium cultivars like ‘Rozanne’ are available in #1 containers from Nature Hills Nursery.

10. Oregano ()

The tasty herb with its tiny pink or white flowers is a culinary delight, just not to rabbits.

A close up of a garden border with flowering oregano next to a wooden walkway, pictured on a soft focus background.A close up background picture of Greek oregano. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.Greek Oregano

Check out our oregano growing guide for more information.

Greek oregano seeds are available in various packet sizes from True Leaf Market.

11. Salvia ( spp.)

Our cute hopping buddies tend to leave this cheerful flowering plant alone, maybe because of its scent.

Bright red salvia with dark green foliage growing in the summer garden pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.mint (Lamiaceae) family, so its aroma will probably be just fine for you.

It’s a handy option if you live where it’s hot or dry but still want brilliant color. In colder climes, salvia is also known for its chill tolerance.

And you’re bound to find at least one variety that suits you. Salvia can be perennial or annual, and some types are semi-woody subshrubs or groundcovers.

If you’ve already planted your garden, you can find complementary salvia varieties in colors like red, purple, and blue that grow from one to five feet tall, depending on your selection.

A close up of two boys in front of a large clump of 'Red Hot Sally' Salvia growing in bright sunshine on a soft focus background. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text. ‘Red Hot Sally’

Take a look at our growing guide for the A-Z steps of growing this rabbit-resistant beauty.

‘Red Hot Sally’ salvia seeds are available from True Leaf Market in packets of 1,000.

12. Yarrow ()

This cottage garden, dried-flower, and bouquet favorite is also the rabbit’s least favorite. A win-win!

Yarrow is a drought resistant perennial that requires full sun and well-drained soil, and it grows best in Zones 3-9.

It’s dependable, long-blooming, and available in shades of pink, salmon, orange, red, white, and yellow, whatever you need.

A close up of the bright yellow flower of gold yarrow growing in the garden, with foliage in soft focus in the background. ‘Gold’ Yarrow

Find detailed information about growing yarrow in our guide.

And revel in the possibilities from our list of hardy yarrow cultivars to grow. How about neon yellow?

Find gold yarrow seeds by the packet or in bulk from Eden Brothers.

13. Zinnia ( spp.)

These bright, cheery annuals are easy to grow in full sun. They come in a variety of sizes, from dwarf miniatures to those that grow four or five feet tall.

A close up of a pink cactus flowering zinnia pictured on a soft focus background.A cottage garden with a clump of 'Giant Cactus' zinnias on a soft focus background. ‘Super Cactus’

To me, they look like brightly colored mini haystacks. Instant cheer!

A variety of zinnia seeds are available from Eden Brothers, including a ‘Super Cactus’ giant mix in several packet sizes.

Hop On Down the Trail, Nibbling Bunnies!

Remember, there’s always a slight risk that rabbits will find some flowering plant in your garden to be to their taste.

A close up of a rabbit nibbling on a plant, pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.flowering plants has you in garden planning mode, read these other helpful guides next:

“13 Flowering Plants Rabbits Will Leave Alone” was first posted here

Leave a Reply

Get Your Garden Right The First TimeLearn exactly how to build and care for your garden. Sign up and never miss awesome gardening tips and ideas.